Posts

Guides’ Day Off

What do two Tyax Adventures guides do on their days off?  Why more adventures of course.

Here’s a little article written by guide Adrian Bostock about a recent mountain bike trip in our backyard, some good thoughts on Adventure.  What’s not noted is that we started this adventure at the beautiful Sky Camp, and what a paradise it was!  You’ll never really know what an amazing place this is until you get out there and visit it for yourself.  The 2 day ride in/out isn’t necessary, unless you’re into that, we can fly you in and you’ll be there lounging in the peace of this idyllic (cell phone & internet free) spot!

Enjoy the read, I sure enjoyed the trip.

Drinking from the Source

Happy Canada Day!

For me it’s the Canada Day long weekend that really signifies the start of summer.  By July 1st most of the last patches of snow remaining on the high passes have melted out, the wildflowers have started blooming, the sun has been out enough to warm the lake up to a tolerable “refreshing” temperature, and vacations have started.
Happy Canada Day - Tyax ResortTyax Adventures season is in full swing now, with the horses all warmed up, fit and happy to be back to work.  Our backcountry camps have been opened up for the season and the first group has already been through Bear Paw.

Canada Day Long weekend at Bear PAw

The floatplane is busy on weekends as per the normal summer craze, but for those who can sneak away mid-week not only will you save some $$ on the price of the flight but you’ll usually have your pick of time slots and the trails to yourself!

Canada DAy Adventures, photo by Pat Mulrooney

We hope you get out for some adventures to celebrate the day and the start to another fabulous summer season!

A day in the life of a wrangler

Have you ever wondered what it is that a cowboy or cowgirl does with their day?  Ride around the range with their trusty steed, keeping an eye out for bandits and strays…  Well that’s not quite so far off, our crew of wranglers here at Tyax Adventures have just been out in the mountains (range) aboard their favourite horses (steeds).  They’ve been busy opening up our camps and keeping the wildlife (bandits) out of the cook-shacks.  Every once in a while they’ll run into a group of mountain bikers or hikers (strays) who hopefully haven’t lost their way.

Setting up Bear Paw Camp

Brennan and Andrea setting up the tents at Bear Paw

 

 

The crew of Wranglers out here have been out in the mountains setting up our remotest camps.  These are the camps where the floatplane can’t access and it’s a long haul by foot or bike to pack in gear and food. This is where the beauty of a packhorse comes in handy, ride along the scenic trails to a truly remote spot and have all your camp gear follow along with you by true horse-power.

 

Wranglers at it clearing the trail

Wranglers working hard to clear a fallen tree off the trail so we can all enjoy the trail

Packing gear and supplies between camps also mean a wrangler’s got to be spry to hop on and off their horse to clear the trail of whatever is in the way.  Horses aren’t quite so spry, sometimes these great big strong animals can’t scramble across or under some of the big logs that hikers and bikers might be able to so the wranglers have got to hop off and do some work themselves.

 

The scenery in the mountains isn’t so bad, while packing gear a wrangler will get to see all sorts of amazing sights.  Being the first group across one of the remote mountain passes a certain year and not knowing what you’ll expect can be pretty exciting.  Getting to see all sorts of wildlife like Grizzly bears, wolves, marmots, black bears, bobcats, mountain goats and so much more!

Pack Train Crossing Manson Pass

First pack train of the year heading across Manson Pass towards Little Paradise

 

A day in the life of a wrangler consists of early mornings feeding horses, then feeding a group of hungry people, including themselves, before packing the horses and moving on to their next spot.  The days are long but the scenery and the true wilderness of the South Chilcotin Mountains keeps them at it.  Great company also helps and our crew are some of the nicest and truest outdoors-people around.