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History of Our 5 Historic Backcountry Camps/Cabins

Tyax Adventures’ Backcountry Camps have a rich history dating back to 1947 during which time hunters, miners, outdoor enthusiasts and hard working locals enjoyed, built and maintained these camps. In 2012, Tyax Adventures acquired these backcountry camps from Spruce Lake Wilderness Adventures, which was owned and operated by the Menhinick family. The Menhinick family is a hard working family of many generations that made their living by horse packing into the Chilcotin and put countless hours into maintaining the camps and trails for everyone of both yesterday and today to enjoy. The Douglas family and Tyax Adventures, are honoured to have the opportunity to carry on the legacy of these remote and unique backcountry camps.

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Trail Maintenance Update – July 2014. By Geoff Playfair.

Tyax Adventures takes a portion of revenue and reinvests it in the trails we use. June was a busy month for trail work in the Park. In partnership with BC Parks, a number of projects were identified and worked on.

New corner on Deer Pass trail, replacing steep, eroded line

New corner on Deer Pass trail, replacing the steep, eroded line

In mid-June, a work crew addressed the lower section of the Deer Pass trail, as it climbs from Trigger Lake. Portions of the steep, eroded, existing trail were decommissioned and new trail created that better uses the terrain between the two creeks flowing off the hill.

112 hours of work went into the trail. Initial feedback is good. The reduced grades are easier for horses and hikers. Bike riders appreciate the increased safety of the descent and the new line, with it’s improved views and enhanced ride.

New Deer Pass trail line crossing old, decommissioned trail

New Deer Pass trail line crossing old, decommissioned trail

 

On June 28/29, 10 members of Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association (WORCA), supported by Tyax Adventures, spent two days maintaining and improving Park trail.  Based out of our Spruce Camp, they worked along the Spruce Lake and Windy Pass trails.

Old undermined bridge

Old undermined bridge

 

Work included a replacement of the bridge out of the campground that had been dangerously undermined by the creek and work on various mud holes and rooted sections around the lake.

Replacement Bridge and decommissioned crossing

Replacement Bridge and decommissioned crossing

The Windy Pass trail, from the Potato patch to the treeline got a haircut and some key trail bed improvements to assist traffic.

Trail work is now on hold for the busy summer season, though some additional projects may move forward in the fall.

Example of work on Windy Pass trail. Braid on the right is decommissioned.

Example of work on Windy Pass trail. Braid on the right is decommissioned.

Spring Trail Updates

Well the Resort is officially open and that means we are ready to go for the season!  We just had a great long weekend with people enjoying the trails surrounding Tyax Resort by horseback, pedal power and on foot.  Guess it’s time for the annual spring trail update to help with your adventure planning!

We like to start off with an update from the River Forecast Centre which shows us a great little graph and gives us a snap shot of this year’s Snow Water (in mm) versus River Forecast Centre Dataprevious years and historically.   Looking at the graph we can see we had less snow at the start of this winter but by the end of March it was looking similar to what we can see the year previous.  Right now it looks very similar to last year which means that by the end of May we should be able to fly into Spruce Lake and the trails around the lake should be mostly clear and rideable out Gun Creek.  As long as things don’t get too cool over the next few weeks we should be looking at a similar year to last, this had us flying into Warner Lake by mid June and into Lorna Lake by the end of June!

The local trails surrounding Tyax Resort are in great condition and a report from our guide & local resident, Geoff Playfair has said; “Trail clearing on local trails is underway. Good spring riding right now, and winter winds were fairly kind – not to much blowdown. Snow is clear to the top of Lick Lower now, which I cleaned up yesterday and is good to go!”.   He also reported that the Pearson Road is mostly clear of snow up to Molly Dog, and that Molly Dog should be rideable by now.

Our wrangler Brennan McGlashan has been busy clearing out the trails around Tyax Resort for Horseback Riding and has gotten most of the work done and clear for trail rides.

Heads up if you’ll be riding, hiking or horseback riding on the Forest Service Roads in the area, there is still some logging activity on the west side of Pearson’s Creek, some on Gun Creek Road towards the Gun Creek Trail and some on the hill above the trail, off the logging road. Speaking to the person in charge of the logging, this should be finished up before summer(July).  No trails are presently affected by this just a note to be aware of machinery and signage.

Our spring trail work projects in addition to the regular clearing and maintenance will be starting soon.  Watch the blog for more updates on what we’ll be working on this year.

Also a final note when planning your adventure up to visit us please note that the Hurley Forest Service Road will NOT be plowed this year.  There have been some changes with regards to the road’s ownership and this has so far translated into a lack of funds for the early season plowing of the snow.  You can read all about it on the I Survived the Hurley website.  Locals are reporting if the road must melt out on it’s own it won’t be open until at least the end of June – early July.

Hope to see everyone soon!

View looking down to Carpenter Lake

The view looking down to Carpenter Lake.

BC Parks Draft Management Plan – Information

Hello friends,

All of us at Tyax Adventures pride ourselves in the services we offer you and the friendships we make along the way. We want you to come visit us and enjoy the South Chilcotin Mountains in the future. Unfortunately, your use of our services and your freedom to travel the park is at risk.

Why? Most of our business is conducted in the South Chilcotin Mountains and Big Creek Parks. A draft management plan for these parks has been presented by BC Parks for comment until the end of May. Simply put, if this plan is implemented as written, there will be drastic changes if you like to mountain bike or fly a float plane in the parks.

Here are a few details of the draft:
  • It segregates recreating by bicycle from other forms of recreation and imposes bicycle only restriction. For example; closing the Lick Creek Trail for the use of a commercial horse operator only,  It also suggests bicycling in the park be allowed only 3 days per week.
  • The draft plan proposes to limit Float plane access to the park to after 9:00 am – this would make landing at Warner Lake improbable. Flights could also be restricted to 2-3 days per week only.
  • Within the draft park plan, ensuring a healthy population of Mountain Goats, Big Horn Sheep and Grizzly Bear recovery is a primary objective and is a priority over recreation and tourism. Restrictions to recreation are suggested within the park to support animal populations, while hunting of Sheep and Goat will continue in the Park and hunting of Grizzly Bears will continue adjacent to the parks.
  • It is proposed that the popular campground at the north end of Spruce Lake is closed.
If the draft plan is implemented, there will certainly be a reduction of access for you, and a reduction of services available from us at Tyax Adventures. The restrictions will result in, at minimum; an increase in aircraft charter rates, or worse case; it no longer being viable for an airplane to be based in the area. The draft plan will have a devastating effect on the local tourism economy of the Bridge River Valley.
Float plane transportation and mountain biking have historically been under represented within the park system.  I believe that a management plan can be created where all recreationalists are treated fairly and that wildlife, tourism and recreation can flourish together in the park.  We plan to present an alternate plan to BC Parks soon and hope that you support it.

If you have any questions regarding this and would like to discuss, please fell free to email me at the address below.
Thank you.

Dale Douglas
President/Operations Manager

TYAX ADVENTURES

SLWA / Tyax Air Service Ltd.

Located at Tyax Resort and Spa

Goldbridge, BC

Happy Easter!

Wishing everyone a wonderful Easter weekend full of fun and adventure!  

Happy Easter from Tyax Adventures

 

 

A day in the life of a wrangler

Have you ever wondered what it is that a cowboy or cowgirl does with their day?  Ride around the range with their trusty steed, keeping an eye out for bandits and strays…  Well that’s not quite so far off, our crew of wranglers here at Tyax Adventures have just been out in the mountains (range) aboard their favourite horses (steeds).  They’ve been busy opening up our camps and keeping the wildlife (bandits) out of the cook-shacks.  Every once in a while they’ll run into a group of mountain bikers or hikers (strays) who hopefully haven’t lost their way.

Setting up Bear Paw Camp

Brennan and Andrea setting up the tents at Bear Paw

 

 

The crew of Wranglers out here have been out in the mountains setting up our remotest camps.  These are the camps where the floatplane can’t access and it’s a long haul by foot or bike to pack in gear and food. This is where the beauty of a packhorse comes in handy, ride along the scenic trails to a truly remote spot and have all your camp gear follow along with you by true horse-power.

 

Wranglers at it clearing the trail

Wranglers working hard to clear a fallen tree off the trail so we can all enjoy the trail

Packing gear and supplies between camps also mean a wrangler’s got to be spry to hop on and off their horse to clear the trail of whatever is in the way.  Horses aren’t quite so spry, sometimes these great big strong animals can’t scramble across or under some of the big logs that hikers and bikers might be able to so the wranglers have got to hop off and do some work themselves.

 

The scenery in the mountains isn’t so bad, while packing gear a wrangler will get to see all sorts of amazing sights.  Being the first group across one of the remote mountain passes a certain year and not knowing what you’ll expect can be pretty exciting.  Getting to see all sorts of wildlife like Grizzly bears, wolves, marmots, black bears, bobcats, mountain goats and so much more!

Pack Train Crossing Manson Pass

First pack train of the year heading across Manson Pass towards Little Paradise

 

A day in the life of a wrangler consists of early mornings feeding horses, then feeding a group of hungry people, including themselves, before packing the horses and moving on to their next spot.  The days are long but the scenery and the true wilderness of the South Chilcotin Mountains keeps them at it.  Great company also helps and our crew are some of the nicest and truest outdoors-people around.