Trail Maintenance Update – July 2014. By Geoff Playfair.

Tyax Adventures takes a portion of revenue and reinvests it in the trails we use. June was a busy month for trail work in the Park. In partnership with BC Parks, a number of projects were identified and worked on.

New corner on Deer Pass trail, replacing steep, eroded line

New corner on Deer Pass trail, replacing the steep, eroded line

In mid-June, a work crew addressed the lower section of the Deer Pass trail, as it climbs from Trigger Lake. Portions of the steep, eroded, existing trail were decommissioned and new trail created that better uses the terrain between the two creeks flowing off the hill.

112 hours of work went into the trail. Initial feedback is good. The reduced grades are easier for horses and hikers. Bike riders appreciate the increased safety of the descent and the new line, with it’s improved views and enhanced ride.

New Deer Pass trail line crossing old, decommissioned trail

New Deer Pass trail line crossing old, decommissioned trail

 

On June 28/29, 10 members of Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association (WORCA), supported by Tyax Adventures, spent two days maintaining and improving Park trail.  Based out of our Spruce Camp, they worked along the Spruce Lake and Windy Pass trails.

Old undermined bridge

Old undermined bridge

 

Work included a replacement of the bridge out of the campground that had been dangerously undermined by the creek and work on various mud holes and rooted sections around the lake.

Replacement Bridge and decommissioned crossing

Replacement Bridge and decommissioned crossing

The Windy Pass trail, from the Potato patch to the treeline got a haircut and some key trail bed improvements to assist traffic.

Trail work is now on hold for the busy summer season, though some additional projects may move forward in the fall.

Example of work on Windy Pass trail. Braid on the right is decommissioned.

Example of work on Windy Pass trail. Braid on the right is decommissioned.

Happy Canada Day!

For me it’s the Canada Day long weekend that really signifies the start of summer.  By July 1st most of the last patches of snow remaining on the high passes have melted out, the wildflowers have started blooming, the sun has been out enough to warm the lake up to a tolerable “refreshing” temperature, and vacations have started.
Happy Canada Day - Tyax ResortTyax Adventures season is in full swing now, with the horses all warmed up, fit and happy to be back to work.  Our backcountry camps have been opened up for the season and the first group has already been through Bear Paw.

Canada Day Long weekend at Bear PAw

The floatplane is busy on weekends as per the normal summer craze, but for those who can sneak away mid-week not only will you save some $$ on the price of the flight but you’ll usually have your pick of time slots and the trails to yourself!

Canada DAy Adventures, photo by Pat Mulrooney

We hope you get out for some adventures to celebrate the day and the start to another fabulous summer season!

Spring Trail Updates

Well the Resort is officially open and that means we are ready to go for the season!  We just had a great long weekend with people enjoying the trails surrounding Tyax Resort by horseback, pedal power and on foot.  Guess it’s time for the annual spring trail update to help with your adventure planning!

We like to start off with an update from the River Forecast Centre which shows us a great little graph and gives us a snap shot of this year’s Snow Water (in mm) versus River Forecast Centre Dataprevious years and historically.   Looking at the graph we can see we had less snow at the start of this winter but by the end of March it was looking similar to what we can see the year previous.  Right now it looks very similar to last year which means that by the end of May we should be able to fly into Spruce Lake and the trails around the lake should be mostly clear and rideable out Gun Creek.  As long as things don’t get too cool over the next few weeks we should be looking at a similar year to last, this had us flying into Warner Lake by mid June and into Lorna Lake by the end of June!

The local trails surrounding Tyax Resort are in great condition and a report from our guide & local resident, Geoff Playfair has said; “Trail clearing on local trails is underway. Good spring riding right now, and winter winds were fairly kind – not to much blowdown. Snow is clear to the top of Lick Lower now, which I cleaned up yesterday and is good to go!”.   He also reported that the Pearson Road is mostly clear of snow up to Molly Dog, and that Molly Dog should be rideable by now.

Our wrangler Brennan McGlashan has been busy clearing out the trails around Tyax Resort for Horseback Riding and has gotten most of the work done and clear for trail rides.

Heads up if you’ll be riding, hiking or horseback riding on the Forest Service Roads in the area, there is still some logging activity on the west side of Pearson’s Creek, some on Gun Creek Road towards the Gun Creek Trail and some on the hill above the trail, off the logging road. Speaking to the person in charge of the logging, this should be finished up before summer(July).  No trails are presently affected by this just a note to be aware of machinery and signage.

Our spring trail work projects in addition to the regular clearing and maintenance will be starting soon.  Watch the blog for more updates on what we’ll be working on this year.

Also a final note when planning your adventure up to visit us please note that the Hurley Forest Service Road will NOT be plowed this year.  There have been some changes with regards to the road’s ownership and this has so far translated into a lack of funds for the early season plowing of the snow.  You can read all about it on the I Survived the Hurley website.  Locals are reporting if the road must melt out on it’s own it won’t be open until at least the end of June – early July.

Hope to see everyone soon!

View looking down to Carpenter Lake

The view looking down to Carpenter Lake.

BC Parks Draft Management Plan – Information

Hello friends,

All of us at Tyax Adventures pride ourselves in the services we offer you and the friendships we make along the way. We want you to come visit us and enjoy the South Chilcotin Mountains in the future. Unfortunately, your use of our services and your freedom to travel the park is at risk.

Why? Most of our business is conducted in the South Chilcotin Mountains and Big Creek Parks. A draft management plan for these parks has been presented by BC Parks for comment until the end of May. Simply put, if this plan is implemented as written, there will be drastic changes if you like to mountain bike or fly a float plane in the parks.

Here are a few details of the draft:
  • It segregates recreating by bicycle from other forms of recreation and imposes bicycle only restriction. For example; closing the Lick Creek Trail for the use of a commercial horse operator only,  It also suggests bicycling in the park be allowed only 3 days per week.
  • The draft plan proposes to limit Float plane access to the park to after 9:00 am – this would make landing at Warner Lake improbable. Flights could also be restricted to 2-3 days per week only.
  • Within the draft park plan, ensuring a healthy population of Mountain Goats, Big Horn Sheep and Grizzly Bear recovery is a primary objective and is a priority over recreation and tourism. Restrictions to recreation are suggested within the park to support animal populations, while hunting of Sheep and Goat will continue in the Park and hunting of Grizzly Bears will continue adjacent to the parks.
  • It is proposed that the popular campground at the north end of Spruce Lake is closed.
If the draft plan is implemented, there will certainly be a reduction of access for you, and a reduction of services available from us at Tyax Adventures. The restrictions will result in, at minimum; an increase in aircraft charter rates, or worse case; it no longer being viable for an airplane to be based in the area. The draft plan will have a devastating effect on the local tourism economy of the Bridge River Valley.
Float plane transportation and mountain biking have historically been under represented within the park system.  I believe that a management plan can be created where all recreationalists are treated fairly and that wildlife, tourism and recreation can flourish together in the park.  We plan to present an alternate plan to BC Parks soon and hope that you support it.

If you have any questions regarding this and would like to discuss, please fell free to email me at the address below.
Thank you.

Dale Douglas
President/Operations Manager

TYAX ADVENTURES

SLWA / Tyax Air Service Ltd.

Located at Tyax Resort and Spa

Goldbridge, BC

Happy Easter!

Wishing everyone a wonderful Easter weekend full of fun and adventure!  

Happy Easter from Tyax Adventures

 

 

A New Plan for the South Chilcotin Mountains Park

A draft management plan has been published for the South Chilcotin and Big Creek Parks. The draft includes restrictions to recreation and tourism, specifically to mountain biking and floatplanes. Do you like the option of flying into Spruce, Warner and Lorna Lakes? Would you like to continue to ride your bike on the trails within the Park?

You have until April 30th to let BC Parks know your thoughts – we hope you can spend a little bit of time to do so.

For more information about the new plan and to have your say visit:
http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/planning/mgmtplns/lillooet/lillooet_mp.html

Wildflowers in the Gun Meadows

 

Explore the South Chilcotin Wilderness on a Packhorse trip with Warren Menhinick

If you’ve been to the South Chilcotin area before chances are you’ve heard at least a mention about the history of the mining and pioneers in the area, but perhaps you don’t know how it has gone from a mining area to a wilderness lovers paradise.  In the late 1800s and early 1900s pioneers started migrating to the South Chilcotin and Bridge River Valley areas in search of mining and ranching opportunities.  These pioneers moved around the area on horseback with packhorses to help move all of their equipment and belongings around this vast wilderness.  As they explored the area by horseback they laid down some of the trail routes we still use today.  Guide outfitters started up to provide the miners with packhorses to move their supplies and equipment throughout the hills.  Through time the mining in the valley slowed down and focus turned to more recreational pursuits.  The Menhinick family originally moved to the Bridge River Valley to work in the Bralorne mines, when the mine shut down in the 70s Warren’s father Barry Menhinick purchased a ranch and his company, Spruce Lake Wilderness Adventures was the first commercial company to operate in what is now the South Chilcotin Mountain park.  media-horse2

Warren grew up in these hills, exploring with his father and learning the secrets of these valleys and mountains.  His knowledge of the area is unsurpassed by most, and he knows every secret nook and cranny out there.  Here are Tyax Adventures we are so happy to have Warren guiding 2 of our Wilderness Packhorse trips this summer.  Each of these 7 day tours will start at our base of operations at Tyax Wilderness Resort & Spa.  This Resort is a hidden gem tucked away on the shores of Tyaughton Lake, it offers the perfect place to base before heading into the South Chilcotin Mountains on a packhorse adventure.  The first day on the trail you’ll head deep into the wilderness through wildflower filled alpine meadows to spectacular mountain-top ridges.  Warren will show you the best spots for seeing mountain goats and bighorn sheep.  Each day you’ll explore a new area, moving between our backcountry camps and setting up temporary spike camps as you move deeper into the wilderness.  Warren has some favourite spots he will show you along the way and you’ll be sure to spend a night a the spectacular Spruce Lake, a sapphire hued sub-alpine lake with a moutainous backdrop that’s every photographer’s dream.  Warren in the South Chilcotin Mountains

 

If you’ve ever had any interest in learning more about wrangling and packhorses, Warren is definitely the mountain man to ask.  Ask him about it during the trip and he’ll be sure to get you learning more about the horses and honing your wrangler skills.

Don’t miss out on this amazing Wilderness Packhorse Adventure in the South Chilcotin Mountains.  The first trip with Warren is full, the second trip starts July 28th, 2014 and ends August 3rd, 2014.  This trip is designed for those with some previous riding experience, if you haven’t been on a horse before but would like to join this trip then try taking a couple of horseback riding lessons now or get out on a few trail rides before this longer trip.  To book your space contact us directly at fun@tyaxadventures.com and we’ll be happy to help you set up your Wilderness Packhorse Adventure!

Waiting on Winter – Planning for the Backcountry

While the snow is taking it’s time to join us this winter there are plenty of thing to do to keep busy and help us prepare for a great backcountry ski season.  Due to the lack of skiing, I’ve had plenty of time to read up on all sorts of ski related things… trip planning info, conditions reports, gear reviews, general safety and so much more!

***The snow started falling as I was writing this!  Check out the photos of snow at Tyax Resort on our Facebook page.***

Safety should be a number one priority for anyone traveling in the backcountry, followed closely by fun.  At the beginning of the season it’s always a good idea to remind ourselves of our safety training.  Along with checking your safety gear, and practicing with it before going out,  A great little article by local ACMG ASG, Alex Wigley, about The Problem with Avalanche Rescuewith some important things to consider.

A little bit of trip planning is essential for any backcountry excursion, something that can be glossed over when one person in the group does the planning for the group. Know where you’re going, the terrain options, the conditions, what resources are available, are all key pieces of info in planning. As backcountry enthusiasts reading and understanding the information put out by the Canadian Avalanche Centre  is always a starting point. There is also some great reading on the Forecasters blog -which covers a variety of topics on a more in-depth scale, and the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides (ACMG),  Mountain Condition Reports (MCR).Eldorado Cabin view

With all the new technology these days having at least one method of communication is not only easily available it’s also quite a bit more affordable. Renting a Satellite phone is common these days, or purchasing a GPS tracking device with SOS messaging capabilities (Personal Locator Beacon) can be done under a couple hundred dollars.  SPOT and inReach both offer great products, each with their own pros and cons and worth the investment.  If you happen to be in an area with Cell phone reception knowing exactly where you can get reception is key, but relying on cell reception in the backcountry isn’t recommended as we all know that cell phone battery life is limited and reception can be intermittent.  Also being aware that electronic devices can affect your transceiver so keeping your electronics separated (20 cms at least) will help in minimizing this interference.

Our little cabin is a ski tourers’ paradise, tucked away in the South Chilcotin Mountains, it’s miles away from civilization.  Being in such a remote location this also requires guests to be totally self supported and prepared for all types of situations.  We ask that guests read the Cabin information provided thoroughly and come prepared to have an awesome backcountry trip.

So why not take some time now to read up… perhaps while doing some chair squats to keep those legs in ski-shape!

Happy Holidays!

Wishing you all the best during the holiday season. May the new year bring health, happiness and lots of Adventure!

-From the whole Tyax Adventures crew.

Hope to see you next year!

Happy Holidays

 

Fall; more than just pretty colours

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Fall colours along Gun Creek

Fall has got to be my favourite season… Don’t get me wrong summer is awesome, especially this past summer with lots of long hot days, perfect for full day adventures in the mountains and refreshing jumps into the lake. Winter’s not bad either, with white fluffy snow comes a whole new set of adventures. But fall is special, there’s something about the crisp fresh air, and there’s nothing nicer than a crisp sunny fall day outside.  The leaves change colours, spectacular golden yellows and reds, even the dying fireweed turns a dark burgundy covering the hillsides in blankets of deep reds.  But there’s a lot more to fall than just these gorgeous colours.  Fall is a great time for foraging!  After having spent a few years out here in the South Chilcotin Mountains, wandering through the woods seeing all sorts of weird looking flora & fungi, I decided to start learning more about what it all was.

Shaggy Mane Mushroom

Shaggy Mane Mushroom

Luckily for me, local resident & Tyax Adventures guide, Geoff Playfair was around to answer many of my questions and impart some of his vast knowledge to me.  I’ve picked Geoff’s brain about so many things these days he probably runs and hides every time he sees me.  Some of his wisdom I’ve picked up on is that there are tons of different types of fungi around, many of them edible, and some not as much.  When foraging for mushrooms bring a guide book, take notes & photos, and if you’re unsure bring your notes & photos to someone who’s got more experience than you.  The first mushroom I identified was in my front yard, a Shaggy Mane, according to Geoff’s identification of my photo, edible too if you get it while it’s young and before it turns to a black inky blob… hmmm.  Geoff’s been out hunting for field mushrooms at his wife’s request.  To help correctly identify these Geoff recommended taking a ‘spore print’, which I promptly googled and learned that it makes a really nice piece of art as well!

Another coveted mushroom, the morel, grew in abundance in the hills surrounding Tyax Wilderness Resort & Spa and other parts of the South Chilcotin that were affected by the forest fires in 2009.  The year following a forest fire the disturbance usually causes morel mushrooms to sprout up, the summer of 2010 & 2011 the South Chilcotin saw morel mushrooms sprouting up everywhere, a chef’s dream!

Rosehips

A handful of colourful rosehips

Along with plenty of other mushrooms to search for a common sight along the trails and roadsides right now are Rosehips.  These are bright red & orange bulbs that grow after the petals of the rose have fallen off usually in September & October.  A great source of Vitamin C rosehips can help ward off the pesky fall cold by providing you with a huge boost of this essential nutrient.  Great for tea or making jelly & jam.

A real fall treat is the Harvest moon, this year we weren’t able to see it as clear due to some cloudy skies, but just seeing the brightness peak out behind the clouds was a gorgeous sight.  Marking the true start to fall, the Harvest moon is the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox, this year falling on September 22nd.  Get ready for a fantastic fall seasons and don’t let shorter days or a little rain keep you from enjoying a fantastic fall!

*Be careful what you pick & eat, always use the guidance of someone knowledgeable & trusted.  We don’t recommend foraging without expert assistance*